What Lenses Are Recommended For DSLRs? Read more

What Lenses Are Recommended For DSLRs?

When you bought your DSLR, chances are there is already a lens included. Commonly, this lens is called the kit lens and works fine for your regular photography needs. But as you advance in knowledge and skills in photography, you realize your kit lens will not be enough for those shoots you need to make.

With that said, there are hundreds of lenses available in the market today to fill those needs. However, the variety of these lenses as far as features and capabilities are concerned can be overwhelming for a newbie photographer to choose which would be best for his/her needs. To make things simple, we have narrowed down the selection to the most common types we think you will need as a photographer like surrey wedding photographer.

Ultra Wide Lenses

Ultra wide angle lenses havelens-190972_1280 a focal length of around less than 24 mm (in 35 mm-format), this means they can take in a wider scene than is typical, though they’re not only about getting all of a subject into a shot. Because of this characteristic, they typically have a large depth of field which means images tend to pull in subjects that are close, and push away more distant ones making them appear further apart.  They are typically used inlandscape, architecture and interior photography, as well as other creative uses.

Wide Angle Lenses

Wide angle lenses have a focal length of between 24 mm and 35 mm, with a wide field of view and often also boast of close minimum focusing distances. Thus, they can magnify the perceived distance between subjects in the foreground and background, providing less distortion ultra wide lenses. They are often used when trying to get the whole of a subject in frame like a building or a landscape, as well as interesting portraits.

Telephoto Lenses

Telephoto lenses are those with a focal length above 70 mm, though many people would argue that “true” telephoto lenses are ones which exceed 135 mm. They focus on a much narrower field of view than other lenses, which makes them good in focusing in on specific details or distant subjects. They are generally larger and heavier than equally specified wider lenses. They can also compress elements such that the objects that are far apart in reality from the camera can appear closer together. They are used often to photograph subjects you can’t (or don’t want to) get close to, like sports or wildlife subjects. They can also be used for shooting portraits and even landscapes where their normalization of relative size can be used to give a sense of scale.

Superzoom Lenses

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Superzooms are do-it-all lenses which cover focal lengths from wide to telephoto. If you’re someone who doesn’t like the hassle of changing lenses often, superzooms may be for you. The flipside though is that they do not have the same image quality of more dedicated lenses and often have slower and variable maximum apertures.

Macro Lenses

Macro lenses are the more specialist type of lenses, and they are frequently used to refer to lenses which can be used for extreme close-up photography. Such lenses typically have focal lengths of around 40-200 mm. Because of its close-up functionalities, macro lenses have excellent image sharpness, though it’s worth noting that when working at close distances they also have a tiny depth of field. In addition, they can also be great for portraits thanks to their typical sharpness and focal lengths.

Summary

As we have seen, different lenses can give photographers more freedom and capabilities in shooting different types of images under different settings and situations. Thus, it is important that as a photographer, you should first determine the type of photography that you do and the environments you are in that will help you in choosing the perfect lenses for your camera. With proper care and maintenance lenses are good photography investments that can last longer than even your camera.

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DSLR Basics Every Newbie Photographer Should Know Read more

DSLR Basics Every Newbie Photographer Should Know

For a person making the switch from using a regular point and shoot camera to a DSLR camera, the transition can be an overwhelming and intimidating experience. This leads to some users to just give up and be content using the auto function of the DSLR, not realizing the full potential these cameras bring if these users knew what DSLRs can do.

That is why we have come up with this handy guide to help users like you make the most of your DSLR and help you discover what you can do with it in ways you never thought about with a camera and hone your skills as a photographer in the process.

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Learning and Setting Apertures and Shutter Speeds

One of the most important concepts in DSLR photography is learning the concept of apertures and shutter speeds. First, let’s learn what they are and each of them can do.

Aperture refers to the size of the opening in the camera lens which determines how much light can pass through. For instance, an aperture of f/2.8 means it is a large aperture that entails much light can pass through it, while an f/16 aperture is smaller in size, with little light can pass through it.

Aperture size indicates how much depth of field an image will have. This means that a small aperture allows the image to show objects located at a great distance to be captured clearly and in focus as in landscape photos. A large aperture on the other hand puts distant objects out of focus while the object located closest to the camera is captured more vividly and in greater detail, as is employed in close up shots.

Shutter speed on the other hand refers to the length of time the shutter stays open to capture a photo. This is something to take in consideration especially if your subject is a fast moving object. For instance, a faster shutter speed value of 1/250 sec allows you to vividly capture a running dog without any blur caused by the movement. Conversely, a slow shutter speed value of 1/15 sec captured blurred movements of the water which can create some artistic shots as well.

Learning about ISO

ISO measures how sensitive to light your camera’s sensor is, especially in relation to how much light is available in the area where you will be taking photos. For instance, outdoor shoots on a sunny day require less sensitivity to light of the sensor, thus needing only low ISO settings. However, low light conditions require greater sensitivity to light. Thus high ISO settings are preferred in this case.

You can either set the ISO settings to auto or you can select which ISO level to use as professionals like Emma Joy would do. But as a beginner, it is recommended you leave the ISO settings at auto or choose the settings at 400-800 for outdoors and 1600 and above for indoors. Take note though that higher ISO settings may cause graininess on the photo.

Controlling Metering Settings (If Needed)

Metering refers to the calculation your camera makes for the average exposure, making sure that the photo is properly exposed which means it’s neither too dark nor too bright. Under normal lighting situations, the camera does the work so nothing else is needed to be done on your end, which also makes this control an overlooked one. However, in low light areas, the camera may not be able to do the metering properly. That is why the DSLR has an “exposure composition” control which is the +/- button near the camera shutter, allowing you to increase or decrease the lighting exposure that would be applied on to the image.

Changing the White Balance Settings

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White balance refers to how the colors appear in your photos, not just the white. Normally, the camera sets the white balance to auto and while it does the job in some cases, in other situations, it causes unrealistic color tones to appear in your photo. Thus, it is important to adjust your DSLR’s white balance settings beforehand for better results. Fortunately, the white balance settings provide different presets available to suit the lighting condition in the area where you will shoot, ranging from daylight to shade, to fluorescent (for areas mainly lighted by fluorescent lights) and flash, (for instances you will use flash, especially in minimal light) among other settings.

Final Tips

Lastly, always make it a point to read your DSLR’s manual to get you more acquainted with your camera and the controls it offers. Many DSLRs today offer more advanced features than before; discover what features they offer that would help you shoot better photographs.

As you learn more about your DSLR, try to experiment with different settings and setting combinations to get a better grasp of how each element works in achieving overall quality of your photos.

 

 

 

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