What Lenses Are Recommended For DSLRs? Read more

What Lenses Are Recommended For DSLRs?

When you bought your DSLR, chances are there is already a lens included. Commonly, this lens is called the kit lens and works fine for your regular photography needs. But as you advance in knowledge and skills in photography, you realize your kit lens will not be enough for those shoots you need to make.

With that said, there are hundreds of lenses available in the market today to fill those needs. However, the variety of these lenses as far as features and capabilities are concerned can be overwhelming for a newbie photographer to choose which would be best for his/her needs. To make things simple, we have narrowed down the selection to the most common types we think you will need as a photographer like surrey wedding photographer.

Ultra Wide Lenses

Ultra wide angle lenses havelens-190972_1280 a focal length of around less than 24 mm (in 35 mm-format), this means they can take in a wider scene than is typical, though they’re not only about getting all of a subject into a shot. Because of this characteristic, they typically have a large depth of field which means images tend to pull in subjects that are close, and push away more distant ones making them appear further apart.  They are typically used inlandscape, architecture and interior photography, as well as other creative uses.

Wide Angle Lenses

Wide angle lenses have a focal length of between 24 mm and 35 mm, with a wide field of view and often also boast of close minimum focusing distances. Thus, they can magnify the perceived distance between subjects in the foreground and background, providing less distortion ultra wide lenses. They are often used when trying to get the whole of a subject in frame like a building or a landscape, as well as interesting portraits.

Telephoto Lenses

Telephoto lenses are those with a focal length above 70 mm, though many people would argue that “true” telephoto lenses are ones which exceed 135 mm. They focus on a much narrower field of view than other lenses, which makes them good in focusing in on specific details or distant subjects. They are generally larger and heavier than equally specified wider lenses. They can also compress elements such that the objects that are far apart in reality from the camera can appear closer together. They are used often to photograph subjects you can’t (or don’t want to) get close to, like sports or wildlife subjects. They can also be used for shooting portraits and even landscapes where their normalization of relative size can be used to give a sense of scale.

Superzoom Lenses

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Superzooms are do-it-all lenses which cover focal lengths from wide to telephoto. If you’re someone who doesn’t like the hassle of changing lenses often, superzooms may be for you. The flipside though is that they do not have the same image quality of more dedicated lenses and often have slower and variable maximum apertures.

Macro Lenses

Macro lenses are the more specialist type of lenses, and they are frequently used to refer to lenses which can be used for extreme close-up photography. Such lenses typically have focal lengths of around 40-200 mm. Because of its close-up functionalities, macro lenses have excellent image sharpness, though it’s worth noting that when working at close distances they also have a tiny depth of field. In addition, they can also be great for portraits thanks to their typical sharpness and focal lengths.

Summary

As we have seen, different lenses can give photographers more freedom and capabilities in shooting different types of images under different settings and situations. Thus, it is important that as a photographer, you should first determine the type of photography that you do and the environments you are in that will help you in choosing the perfect lenses for your camera. With proper care and maintenance lenses are good photography investments that can last longer than even your camera.

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A review of the Olympus OM-D EM5 Mark II Read more

A review of the Olympus OM-D EM5 Mark II

After the rousing success of the OM-D EM5, Olympus recently unveiled the successor to this successful compact mirrorless camera, the OM-D EM5 Mark II. How does it fare compared to its predecessor and to other mirrorless cameras out in the market? We shall find out in this review.

Design and controls

First things first, the EM5 Mark II looks very much like its predecessor. However, the EM5 Mark II offers some improvements in the design, with a better grip, easier navigation of the control dials even with one hand while still retaining a good, solid build for its body.

The camera offers a large and detailed electronic viewfinder, one of the best viewfinders found in cameras today which provides great detail and information and a fully-articulated 3 inch touchscreen LCD that provides a better intuitive interface. It also offers a built-in Wi-Fi connectivity for better sharing of the images caught on this camera.

Superior image quality

The EM5 Mark II offers a native 16 megapixel image resolution. It also has a high-speed Live MOS Sensor which offers an improved performance and a remarkable level of clarity and speed in all aspects of image capture. The camera’s TruePic VII image-processing engine improves image quality as well in low-light environments.

The camera’s sensor allows for a maximum ISO of 25,600, and the dynamic range has been expanded for more faithful color reproduction. It also offers a quieter mechanical shutter and a fast, accurate, focusing system to better capture images

Image Stabilization

However, the EM5 Mark II’s killer feature is with its performance in image stabilization, a feature many cameras in the market today tend to overlook. In the case of Olympus however, they have developed for this camera an ultra-sensitive 5-axis VCM (voice coil motor) technology that employs updated gyro sensors for a full 5 exposure steps of compensation. This gives the camera an exceptional performance in image stabilization, being able to deliver sharp, clear still images even in low light or steady HD video when capturing movies.

Another good thing is that this feature works with any lens you wish to use for the camera. So if you’re a shropshire wedding photographer, there’s no need to worry about what lens to use that would offer stabilization as the camera does it exceptionally well for you.shropshire wedding photographer

High Resolution Shot

With an improved stabilization mechanism, the EM5 Mark II offers another interesting feature, the 40MP High Res Shot. This allows the camera to shift the sensor over eight frames and then combining them into one higher resolution image of up to a whopping 40 megapixels.

Please note though that this does not increase the camera’s native megapixel resolution; you will still get 16 MP on your camera even when using the High Res Shot feature. What it does instead is enhance the quality of the image taken into the camera and make it more detailed. Also, this feature would only work well in ideal situations and environments, such as still subjects.

Final Thoughts

The Olympus OMD EM5 Mark II is a worthy upgrade from the previous EM5 model as it offers more features and, most especially, an improved photographic performance.

Its features are not only impressive, they are also unique in the sense that not many cameras offer those features, most especially the image stabilization feature. That only makes the EM5 Mark II a solid camera that can rival any mirrorless camera in the market at least. If you are looking for a good mirrorless camera, or a camera that can provide an improved image quality, the Olympus OMD EM5 Mark II is a camera worth very much considering.

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